Eurasier Puppy

Eurasier

(aka: Eurasian, Eurasian Dog)

Eurasier

Size

Large
Male: 20 - 24 inches; 50 - 70 lbs.
Female: 16 - 18 inches; 40 - 60 lbs.

Color

Fawn, red, wolf-gray, solid black, and black and tan.

Living Area

Can live in an apartment, or a home with a yard, but prefer to be with the family or they can become depressed.

Shedding

Moderate

Energy Level

Moderate

Life Span

11 - 13 years

Description | Temperament | Grooming | History | Training | Health Problems

Eurasier Description

The Eurasier is a balanced, well-constructed, medium-sized Spitz type dog with prick ears. The Eurasier should have a thick undercoat and medium-long, loosely lying guard hair all over the body, with a short coat on the muzzle, face, ears, and front legs. The tail and the back of the front legs (feathers) and hind legs (breeches) should be covered with long hair. The coat on the Eurasier's neck should be slightly longer than on the body, but not forming a mane. The breed may have a pink, blue-black or spotted tongue.

Eurasier Temperament

An excellent companion dog, the Eurasier is calm, quiet, even tempered and friendly. Watchful and alert. Affectionate and loyal towards its family, yet reserved and shy with strangers, without being timid or aggressive. Socialize well when young with other dogs and people. This breed forms a strong bond with its family. They are intelligent and quick to learn.

Consistent training should start early. Responds well to training, however one must understand the breed in order to train them successfully. This breed does not respond well to ruthless discipline, you must use soft reprimand; firm, but not harsh. Proper human to canine communication is a must. They can get bored if the training becomes repetitive. If they sense the owners are meek or passive they may become stubborn. Many Eurasier excel at agility. Playful, a stable minded Eurasier will get along well with children who have good pack leader skills. They are not guard dogs, but make good watchdogs, barking at things that are unfamiliar to them. This breed rarely barks with out good reason; however, as with any breed, some are more vocal than others and you need to communicate to them when enough is enough. Do not allow them to bark at you when they want something as that is a dog displaying dominancy behaviors. Usually does well with other dogs.

Eurasier Grooming

Very easy to groom, just needs the occasional brushing on a regular basis.

Eurasier History

Eurasiers originated in Germany in 1960, when the founder, Julius Wipfel, set out together with Charlotte Baldamus and a small group of enthusiasts to create a breed with the best qualities of the Chow Chow and the Wolfspitz . The initial combination of the breeds resulted in what was first called "Wolf-Chow" and then, twelve years later, after crossing with a Samoyed, was renamed Eurasier because it emphasizes that this dog originates from European and Asian breeds. The breed was recognized by the FCI (Fédération Cynologique Internationale - an international dog breed standards organization) in 1973. Nobel Laureate Konrad Lorenz obtained a Eurasier puppy from Charlotte Baldamus, Nanette vom Jaegerhof, whom he called "Babett". He thought her character was the best he had ever known in a dog.

Eurasier Training

Responds well to training, however one must understand the breed in order to train them successfully. This breed does not respond well to ruthless discipline, you must use soft reprimand; firm, but not harsh. Proper human to canine communication is a must. They can get bored if the training becomes repetitive. If they sense the owners are meek or passive they may become stubborn. Many Eurasier excel at agility.

Eurasier Health Problems

Inbreeding was an initial problem with the Eurasier, but the original breeders tried to counter inbreeding problems when the introduced the Samoyed into the breeding lines. The most common problems from the inbreeding are hemolytic anemia (abnormal breakdown of red blood cells), and Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) which can lead to blindness. Breeder are working to eliminate these issues.

Also, like other similar dogs, hip dysplasia is also seen occasionally in this breed.

Hi!
My name is "Buddy" and I'm a yellow lab. My favorite thing to do is fetch a ball. I also like to bark at cars and go swimming in the lake whenever I can. It's great to be a dog!